Recent Free Nonfiction, An Interview, and Great Fiction Sampler

I’m in deadline hell for the next several months, since I took on a project that crammed everything together.  Plus I’m teaching a lot, so I’m unusually busy, even for me.

All of that goes a long way to telling you that I’m behind in letting you know the current news and links.

My bimonthly column has appeared in The Grantville Gazette. This one is on influences and too much reading! Here’s the link.

Bryan Thomas Schmidt did a nice live interview with me on Twitter in early April.  It’s been reprinted on Grasping For The Wind’s website.  You can find that here.

For those of you who read Italian, Letizia Sechi has translated my blog post on what writers need to survive in this new world of publishing (Modern Writer Survival Skills) into Italian.  You can check it out (and practice your Italian) here.

Finally, let me share this cool project that Keith Brooke has done through his Infinities Plus website.  He put together a gigantic e-book sampler of Infinities Plus contributors and friends.  I’m lucky enough to be in it.  This sampler is free.

Here’s the table of contents:

infinity plus authors and their books:

Welcome

Keith Brooke: five volumes of short stories (science fiction, fantasy and horror)

— infinities includes complete short story The Man Who Built Heaven.

Eric Brown: a novella and a collection of short stories (science fiction and fantasy)

— infinities includes complete short story Venus Macabre and an extract from short novel A Writer’s Life.

John Grant: a short novel and novella double and a collection of short stories (science fiction and fantasy)

— infinities includes complete novelette Wooden Horse.

Garry Kilworth: a collection of short stories (science fiction and fantasy)

— infinities includes complete short story Phoenix Man.

Kaitlin Queen: a novel (crime)

— infinities includes an extract from the novel One More Unfortunate.

Iain Rowan: a collection of short stories (crime)

— infinities includes complete short story One Step Closer.

Anna Tambour: a novel and a collection of short stories (literary fantasy and satire)

— infinities includes an extract from the novel Spotted Lily.

friends of infinity plus

Linda Nagata

— infinities includes an extract from the novel Memory.

Scott Nicholson

— infinities includes an extract from the novel The Red Church.

Kristine Kathryn Rusch

— infinities includes an extract from the novel The Disappeared.

Steven Savile

— infinities includes an extract from the novel The Immortal.

and if you really want to know more:

about infinity plus

This is a heck of a line-up and I’m proud to be part of it.  You can order through the Infinities Plus website, or on Smashwords.  I believe the sampler is 99 cents on Kindle (because Amazon won’t let indies put up anything for free), but even that is cheap.  So go enjoy all that reading.

 

3 responses to “Recent Free Nonfiction, An Interview, and Great Fiction Sampler”

  1. […] Kristine Kathryn Rusch: Recent Free Nonfiction, An Interview, and Great Fiction Sampler […]

  2. I’m to the point with my “must read” pile that I am not sure I will ever catch up. I’ve got several dozen novels, and many, many issues of various magazines on my shelves, all waiting to be read. To say nothing of the mass of on-line material I keep wanting to read, especially now that I have the Kindle app loaded to my laptop and can download stories from friends and other Kindle authors.

    My only conclusion is that I’m going to have to learn to stop reading at some point. And by that I mean I am going to have to let it be OK that if a story or a book doesn’t have me within a certain length of time, certain number of pages, etc, I will just have to move on. I’ve avoided this up until now because I’ve always felt it was “lazy” for me to not finish a book or story once I’ve started it. But with literally millions of unread words staring me in the face, I don’t know I can get through it all. Not with my current schedule, where free-time reading almost doesn’t exist, and I have to budget my fiction reading like I budget almost everything else.

    This makes me sad because I know there will be books and stories that aren’t given enough rope. Good material that I will inevitably put down or skip over because I just didn’t give the story or the book enough time to snare me. And I hate that.

    • Kris says:

      I know, Brad. Many years ago now, some sf writer (James Patrick Kelly? Lewis Shiner?) did the math on how many more books he could read in his lifetime. It was a small number, given how many books exist. I didn’t want to think about that–and it’s never left my head. I guess I’ll just have to live forever. 🙂

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