“The Observer” in War & Space

I love it when I get books in the mail that I want to read right now. I have a story in War And Space: Recent Combat, edited by Rich Horton and Sean Wallace, but honestly, when the book arrived, I thought I had ordered it to read. Then I looked and realized this was that anthology, the one Rich and Sean had contacted me about a while ago. I still want to read it. Lots of good writers here, from Nancy Kress to Robert Reed to Alastair Reynolds and so many more. This is an overview of sf war stories published in the past decade, including some classics. My contribution here is “The Observer.” There are many, many other stories you’ll want to read or reread. You can pick up the anthology at  your favorite bookstore or order it here. There’s an ebook edition as well, but I don’t know all the platforms that it’s on. Go, enjoy. I know I will.

Send to Kindle

6 Comments

  1. Darn it. It’s only on Amazon and B&N. Can’t get an epub of it (B&N refuses to accept my money because I’m outside of the US – jerks).

    I’ll add to my list to pick up from the bookstore, then. I love a good SF anthology.

    Reply
  2. Please start listing the Kindle edition in your Amazon store, or include Associate links to it. I want to buy the books on your blog in such a way that you get a commission as well as any royalties due, but I really, really prefer Kindle editions.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Thanks, Marion. I appreciate the thoughtfulness. If you click through on the edition that I link to–the book edition–you can get to the Kindle edition, and it still goes on my Associates account.

      Reply
  3. There were only two 3-star reviews on Amazon. One person complained there was too much psychodrama, not enough war. The other person complained that the stories had mostly been published before.
    Curiously, both of these complaints made me actually WANT to read the stories – so I went and bought it!
    About the person complaining there wasn’t enough war, I wondered if he/she (I forget) had bothered to read the introduction – which clearly states the stories are about all kinds of things surrounding war, including causes and consequences.
    After I read, I hope I’ll be moved to leave a review of my own.
    Reviews are funny – I sometimes like the negative ones: they expose weaknesses that I find to be strengths – or warn me when the sample is too short to really tell. The most useful part of any review is how is complements the book description, especially if that book blurb has already raised a red flag.
    Thanks for mentioning the collection – I think I’m going to like this.

    Reply
    • Thanks, ABE. I use reviews that way sometimes too. My favorite recently was on a reissue of Dracula. The vampire was mean. :-) I hope you do like the collection. The stories I’ve read elsewhere that are included in this volume make me want to read it all the more.

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>